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parliament and calls for new elections. [chanting] a day of prayer in south africa for nelson mandela and leaders including president obama and three former u.s. presidents expected to attend tuesday's memorial service for the late south african president. >> and a crime was never committed and we stood by that. >> reporter: the san antonio four speaking out, released after 16 years behind bars for a crime they have always maintained they did not commit. ♪ the deep freeze is on, wintry weather and cold temperatures reach the east coast. the weather is disrupting travel nationwide and made some sunday nfl games almost impossible to see. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy and the storm caused car pile ups in several states and accidents on the pennsylvania turnpike sunday involved almost 60 video as and this shows the long line of cars that came to a halt in morgan town, pennsylvania and we are tracking the storm. what is the latest? >> all of that snow and wind, it is still with us and we are going to continue to see it taking its toll and creating very
. michelle has to stay and france has to help us hold elections so we can choose a president deserving of that name and leave the country. jadadea has to stay for thetrition >> reporter: there are some people comparing this to rwanda in 1994. the genocide there killed hundreds of thousands of people. there are differences. >> that's with ethnic violene violence. here it is sectarian. religious leaders are preaching peace, not hate. >> there is a growing atmosphere of ven he knew. you can't call it genocide yet. that would be an imprudent. but what's certain is that from now on, in central africa republic, soil will never be same again. >> there are many examples in history of where international forces have intervened too late. for the world, it's finally, taking notice that what is happening herays, bongee. >> praising for new mexico new mexico range from pulpits around the world on this national day of prayer in south africa. members of all faiths honor the former president, a steady flow of mourners stopped by his home in johan he isburg. nigeria called for three days of mourning a
of preventing bloodshed. >> in a two-day seminar, francis hollande is calling for elections from the central african republic by removing the rebels who took control. >> at the end of the two day summit the french together the opportunity of having so many on and talk about the pressing subject, the central african republic. there were plans for the troops to disarm rebels, getting militia into their bases and get the armed men off the street. in the longer terms reducing tensions in the country. >> now, part of the enforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. there are now 1600 french troops in the central african republic. france is engaged in mali. in the longer turn it wants to turn over african policing to african police keeping forces. france is engaged in two countries for time to come. >> a u.s. veteran is back home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a merrill newman arrives home today. his family called his time in north korea, "a difficult ordeal." melissa chan with that story. >> when merrill newman made the trip to remote north korea, he wo
of congress be ineligible for re-election if they don't beat search benchmarks, like the deficit being beneath a certain percentage of the gdp. it's a lot. >> or certain congressman who get a lot of air time like paul ryan and that's a taste of what we'll see pretty soon. ronan, thanks for stopping by today. today's producer pick comes to us from associate producer kristen bukaria. a georgia court has ordered a man to pay up for breaking his promise to marry. he owes his one-time fiance 50,000 large even though the man claims he never officially popped the question. you can read more by heading to thomas roberts facebook page. you've got to put a ring on it, nice tune. we'll be right back. ♪ if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for over ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specifi
to have the mandate of a popular election as the only appointed president, almost a president with an asterisk next to his name. >> she may have supported his bid for the white house but when they first met she didn't know she was getting a politician. is that true? >> that's what she says. it's hard for me to believe she was totally naive. jerry ford was the big man on campus. the local hero from high school days playing football. it's not terribly surprising he should decide to go into public life. but there is no doubt she was surprised. they were married in october 1948. >> and on twitter did the ford's schedule their wedding for october 15 after the republican congressional primary and why? >> the simple answer is yes. have you to know west michigan to appreciate. west michigan more than now was a very culturally conservative place. a place where the dutch reform church held sway. a ford who was certainly conservative ff nevertheless was running against an entrenched republican encome bent who opposed the mar alcohol plan. he was one of those returning veterans who had s
and iran. it is titled -- there is this story from "the weekly standard" focusing on the midterm elections -- next is james joining us this morning from valley village, california. i don't really consider myself an independent or republican or democrat. i see myself as a humanitarian. being that i dedicated my life to traveling the world, i don't see where any types of war or weapons is the solution to anything. next is kathleen from texas. caller: good morning. i am a military mother. quit the military. he trains people for three times what he makes as a private contractor. america is in decline because we have outsourced our wealth. 40% of americans make under 20,000 a year. torture and not outsourced every, -- and outsource slavery. more americans than al qaeda on 9/11 and 10 times the amount of iraq ease and saddam, and he gets a library. that is why america is a joke. i love you, steve. host: kathleen from texas. continue our feature, first ladies, influence and image. you can watch the program every monday beginning at 9:00 eastern time here on c-span. all of the programs from martha
. you have got to be careful what you say when you are in an election. when you say it's going to be the most transparent administration in history you will be held to that standard. >> what about calling the president a liar. is that okay? i think so. i know bob you don't like it. i'm wondering what bob had for breakfast because i'm nodding my head. i think there is a high bar set by the president. when i worked in washington, d.c., we figured out every way to call our opponent anything but a liar. however, during this last presidential election president obama actually used the term and their staff did on his campaign. it shocked a lot of people that they went there first. now that that bar has been lowered and they are calling each other a liar, i do think it's fair. and either they are grossly incompetent or they are deceitful. either way the credibility has been lost. a lot of people gave him goodwill when oh came in to do obamacare. this touches him personally. >> you are touching on something that's important here. it's the way this president came into the white house an
and bobby cox elected to enter the hall in cooperstown, new york. the three managers winning eight world series championships. induction ceremonies will be held july 27. those are your headlines, now back to lori and adam. lori: we are continuing with our wish list theories with a sweet treat for you today. the co-owner of edwards chocolatier. bring them look at during this holiday season. welcome to you. do you do your highest volume of sales this time of year? >> yes, that is right. many do their biggest volume this time of year, december everybody is out there willing to go the extra mile and picked up the product. i really want to give it at the holiday party. lori: will they be more chocolate consuming this year versus last or prior years? >> we definitely in our business we have noticed there has been an uptick in sales this year. more people are willing to spend a little bit more on the luxury items, we have build ourselves as an affordable luxury so it is something we have done very well this year and we have seen our biggest year, this is my great grandparents started this compa
starting a new chapter? >> well, you see in iran we have political elections. popular elections. they chose ahmadinejad eight years ago. they close a different path this election. this is an opportunity for us and for the west in order to dress this issue. we're not talking about sanctions. the affect of sanctions has been two-fold. when sanctions started you iran had less than 2,000 centerfuges. now iran has 18,000 centerfuges. the sanctions have utterly failed in that regard. now it seems to me that the west is trying to take advantage of this historic opportunity. we have a new government in iran with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a ma
for election, took power in 1994, and his deputy president was f.w. de klerk. they did share the nobel prize as you mentioned and the hallmark of his tenure, he established a board of inquiry to look into past atrocities that had been done. what was it called? the truth and reconciliation commission. that's what it was all about. south africa had the economy, has the economy that is the greatest economic engine on the african continent and nelson n mandela did not dismantle that economy, he did not force the kind of redistribution of wealth at a pace in which his supporters wanted it to happen, he said now it's time for us to build, not to function as a revolution anymore. >> thanks, john harwood. we appreciate it. now, we are joined on the phone by robert johnson, who is a cnbc contributor, founder of the rlj and former chairman of b.e.t., old friend of mine. robert, you met nelson mandela many times, okay. how many times did you meet him, what are your thoughts tonight as he passes away? >> yeah, i had the great and humbling pleasure of meeting president mandela on a number of occasions,
people are going to get sick and die with serious illness and next fall as we head to the 2014 elections, a lot of people who got grandfathered will get cancelled again and get sticker shock right before the elections and people in small businesses will be cancelled out. and the employer man date coming back. there is a list of things to go wrong with this? >> jamu, do you see the same sort of pessimistic outlook in terms of obviously 5 million people who got cancellation letters, and do you see more of those in the future f if that happens with the small businesses? >> no, alisyn. it is not about a first imprigz. la rs can agree we have had a time that lost first game of the season and gone on to win the championship. that's what will happen with the affordable. it is more than political issue. it is life or death. before the affordable care act people could not get health insurance. and speaking of dying and you don't have access to health insurance you die. and the affordable care act, for sure they stumbled out of the gate, but this is not a website. >> a bit more than a stum pel. th
looks to make gains in key elections. we'll be in dehli in just over half an hour. >>> and move over, detroit. tensions are moving to other regions drowning in debt, including puerto rico. what it could mean. if you've got any thoughts or comments about anything we're talking about today, e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. the ecb today will be presenting new growth and inflation forecasts alongside the announcement of its latest policy decision. the central bank said it expected a slight rise in inflation in 2014 and '15 and predicated a rise in in inflation across the upper row zone next year. annette is with us now. they cut rates last month. the euro hasn't weakened. we had sharp divergence between germany and france. what do they do now? >> that's a good question, actually, probably. today they won't do anything. we might see more moving towards potential further easing next year. as well, of course, that wouldn't be their first agenda to weaken the euro a little bit towards the dollar. they would never admit that. but it would actually help around the periphery of the eurozone. as
would retire, first elected back in 1978, a member of the senate agricultural committee. cheryl: oh, the farm bill. i think i'm the only person in the building that is fascinated by the farm bill. adam: if i were a park avenue farmer getting government subsidies i might be interested. cheryl: the east coast speaking of the midwest and farmers, east coast is bracing for a blast of winter weather as the storm has been done things to and east through much of the midwest. now heading toward pennsylvania and finally will hit new york and a lot more to come. in the weather center with more on this story. rich: i care about the farm bill. i do. i am on your side on that one. speaking of farmers, rapid city, south dakota, a big blizzard this season and they lost so much livestock and now they have had the cold temperatures across these areas and a lot of cattle ranchers going all the way down across parts of the south. texas desperately needs moisture but they have had the icing variety over the last few days and that is not good at all. high temperatures not just on the planes. you may thi
" is why bill de blasio was elected. the tale of two cities as he put it. a lot of it, steve you have some charts here -- goes to affordable housing. so many elements to this story. it's not a new york city story it's a national story. mika said one in five american children live in poverty. >> it's a national story. what you have are a number of things that come together to create it. you had this terrible recession. you have the rising income equality which is fine for wealthy people to get wealthier but the people at the bottom have gotten poorer. you have reduction in food stamps. the average food stamp income has gone from $33 to $25 as part of this. you got a discussion about the minimum wage. >> you can't live on it. >> there's a whole bunch of things that come together in a perfect storm for people at the bottom and so they feel very picked upon and i think rightly so. >> joe, you would agree you got to make work pay in order to get people network. asking people to work for something they can't afford to support their family on that's not really how welfare reform works. >> i agree
as they head into the midterm elections to be broader than just obama care, democrats realize that if this is about obama care in the mid-term elections it's not a good issue for them and even though we see positive things going on, they want things to be about more than that. for some, this is a signal about getting his mojo back. >> the president's economic policies improve government reliance rather than economic mobility and rather than tackling income inequality by lifting people up, he's been fixated on taxing some down. >> why do you think republicans seem so fixated on the government reliance narrative and this tax and spend. this tax and spend phrase that they of the to use over and over again? >> that's the only message that they've been able to promote, and i think a lot of the republican message has been similar to mitt romney's 47% comments and it's a problem for republicans because they spend the majority of the time since the 2012 elections trying to cut food stamps and we also know they oppose a minimum wage hike with respect to sequestration and they expressed
. the last time was the election year when he could make a case to defend his record. this time you do not have a moment like that way you can say give me another chance. -- dig be harder to send out of a hole like this. it is pretty easy to write off a .ame-duck resident people look for opportunities to do so in this town. you highlight another obstacle facing, digging out of perceptions. the closer we get to 2016, the more they will be fixed. that is a big challenge that this white house faces. we are speaking to scott wilson, the white house bureau chief. we are talking about recent fores, criticism received healthcare.gov. please give us a call. the phone numbers are on the screen. of course, we will also be taking your comments on e-mail, facebook, and twitter. as folks are calling in, we want to ask you about this headline in october. talk about the inattention to detail that you see here. guest: a couple things have come up recently with the national security agency eavesdropping disclosures. he said he was not aware the united states was eavesdropping on a german chancellor's p
for him particularly to have the mandate of a popular election as the only appointed president almost a president with ans a terrific next to his name. >> she may have supported the bid for the white house. when she first met him she didn't know he was getting a politician. >> that's what she said. it's hard to believe she was notely naive. ford was a big man on campus. a local hero. it's not terribly surprising he should decide to go to public life. there's no doubt she was surprised they were married in 1948. >> here is are a agree that. i want to get a request. in after the republican congressional primary, why? >> i think the simple answer is yes. you have to know west michigan to appreciate. west michigan considerably more than now was a culturally conservative place. a place with the dutch reform church held sway. and certainly always a fiscal conservative. never the less, was running against an entrenched republican incumbent. an eyelationallist who opposed the plan. ford was one of the world war ii returning veterans who had seen the consequences of american isolationism. and
on to win a nobel peace prize and was elected south africa's first black president. [ cheering and applause ] >> reporter: served as president until 1999 when he announcement his retirement. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> reporter: despite health problems his retirement years were busy as he worked on behalf of charities and campaigned tirelessly to bring the world cup soccer tournament to his beloved nation. in the summer of 2010 mandela saw that dream realized. his life was a series of battles, but in an interview on his 90th birthday he said he'd do it all again. >> i don't regret it because the things that affected me were things that pleased my soul. >> reporter: i'm renee marsh reporting. >> now, of course, whenever something like this happens, tributes pour in from around the world and, of course, the death of nelson mandela is no different, a lot of folks with a lot to say tonight. >> absolutely. we have the story live from the south african embassy where a statue of mandela went up earlier this year. >> reporter: a few south african natives have come out to pay tribute to
: i hope the country will elect a new government and a new noble president. people who will serve this nation properly. and i hope the blood of our youth won't be spilled. >> they want the resignation of yanukovych and closer ties with the european union. they've occupied government buildings but they now face a deadline to leave by tuesday morning. no one's in a mood to give in. >> translator: i want a new government that listens to the people and doesn't treat us like animals. >> translator: we are here to fight for our rights, so that our kids are brought up in a good country without corruption and where everything's fair. >> yanukovych believes that he has enough support to survive with backing from moscow. the protestors realize that this crisis has now reached a crucial moment. tim friend, al jazeera kiev. >> tensions mount in tield after the -- thailand after the party's main government resigned. at least five people have been killed and hundreds injured since massive antigovernment protestprotests have begun last. calling on the prime minister to resign. >>> winter sto
after the main opposition party resigned. the party says the people no longer accept the elected government. five have been killed and hundreds hurt since protests began last month. they are demanding the prime minister resign. >> protesters in ukraine toppled a statue of lenin. several statues have been removed from kiev. this is the largest demonstration by far. many are outraged that the government is rejecting talks with europe to keep close ties with russia. tim friend has more. >> it they poured into square they know the demonstration has to be big and loud to sustain the pressure on viktor yanukovych. on the edge. crowd young men prepared tactics for the worst outcome, another violent confrontation with riot police. a few streets away officers lined up. last week there was chaos, many injured in a place charge. now there's a standoff. riot police at the ready at one end of the street with shields and trudgeons, and at the other, protesters with their flags. they are waiting in preparation. everyone hopes there won't be the repeat of last week's violence. a solitary priest
, facilitating the first democratic elections and becoming first democratically elected president, first black president as well. you mentioned the 91 heads of state coming, truly is stunning when you look at not only barack obama, but a number of former presidents, george w. bush, jimmy carter and bill clinton as you mentioned. let's not forget the rest of the world is interested, prince kar charles on his way, the brazilian president and french president, u.n. secretary-general and more. as a way of facilitating this massive logistical challenge the government deployed some 11,000 troops to make sure as the interest builds it's on the fourth of the tenth day of mourning people are safe and there are no snags having so many vips here in the country. tomorrow's event, the tuesday memorial service which possibly could be attended by the u.s. president will be the first formal event, followed by nelson mandela's lying in-state at the union building in pretoria wednesday through friday. significant, john, because it was 20 years ago he was sworn in as president at that location. so a euphoric wee
the tailwind to this market is that we've had gridlock in d.c. since the mid term elections of 2010. that is a positive underpinning to both economic growth admitted it's modest, and to the market as a whole. do i think this budget deal is a market mover? not necessarily, but let's face it the market seems to go up on every bit of news right now. stuart: it doesn't hurt and the market wants to go up and i think you're on record saying 18 k for the dow fairly soon. is that right? it is? >> it's coming. i don't know how-- we have to define fairly soon. >> okay. and i will not pin you down, because that was not your forecast. tray knippa, thank you. the opening bell has running. and we're before 16,000. everybody knows i'm a ludwick-- luddite sort of. friday night i ordered a book on amazon and sunday morning it was delivered by the postal service. i thought i'd like you to know that amazon is using the postal service and it works. and another big name you know, it's china mobile. they're going to take orders for apple's iphones starting thursday. apple is up in part on that news. chin
debt ceilings, we have campaigns and elections coming in 2014. what's to say, oops, we didn't get to the other parts of immigration, but now we have more fence and more enforcement on the board rder. >> you know, the activists have not let this go. there's this day of fasting. there are a host of, you know, sort of sit-ins and engagement with republicans who have been intransigent on the issue. this issue is not going away for them, but if, as vicky outlines, the only measures they pass are punitive ones, i think that actually stands them in worst stead with americans in general than if they were to do nothing. >> oh, i think that's abundantly clear. because the bill that democrats and immigration advocates are willing to accept at this point is one that a lot of people are having a hard time swallowing because of this, like, $30 billion to $40 billion they want to throw at militarizing the border and just turning the border. when they say border, you know, they mean dozens of miles outside of the border encompassing tens of millions of peoples' lives. if you happen to live in tha
, my god, that is the title. elected up on the amazon and of the various book catalogs i could find. no one is ever used the title. such an obvious title it also is the title betty essentially gives me into a lot of trouble. i find a very good way of bringing yourself to enter for taking this of town a bigger to is to look and amazon one star reviews. one star reviews, when they say, this is the most boring book and never read in my life. there is 11 star review at the moment from a woman he says, i am an unabashed militant feminist and and so appalled by the fact is called the men who united the rates. so i get no one star of you without even being read. but her view is one that i anticipated. why is it all made? the fact is, the reality is that in the physical united states of america it has been the business, almost entirely, man. there's only one woman who appears in the story, and that is sacajawea analysts in kaj saga. otherwise i'm afraid to say women play and sillery rules. in other an important role and other aspects of america, but not in the physical union of the nation.
and parliamentary elections. this government should resign. >> pictures have emerged from sunday night that show the police were at times brutal in their treatment of protest ors and journalists. anton is a photographer, one of dozens who were beaten by riot police. he pleaded to them to stop. this is what is left of his camera. but the police were also on the receiving end. officials say 35 were hurt by protesters, some in hospital. away from city hall there are no protests, just the grim life of wirpt. tatiana is very much in favor of political change. >> we were on our knees for a long time. now it's time to wake up. i'm grateful for the protestors, i want my children and grandchildren to have better lives. >> they put guards on the barricades. they control the center of kiev. but they will have to convince the rest of the country to follow them. >> that's al jazeera's barnaby phillips. >>> just returned from protest in kiev last week, now with us in chicago. appreciate both of you being with us. again i'll talk with you for a moment, ask you, you were at the protest, what did you see? pavlo?
at sequester and what it is doing to the country. i will leave it at that. the 2014 elections are a highlight of "the wall street journal" this morning. michelle is from chicago on the oppose line. good morning. i am opposed to the drones. chicago and ie in am always worried about terror attacks and we are on high alert , i live in an area where summary foreclosures and empty homes. we just had to merge schools and you have money for drones? i don't understand things like that. i don't understand how they have closed so many mental facilities here. we have these people walking in our neighborhood and we are afraid. we have so many people out of work and this would just take more jobs from our countrymen. i don't agree, i don't understand it, and i don't understand how -- no one has even heard of this. i am very concerned. in "the wall street journal close quote there is a story about the changes in the inner circle of president obama. several allies of the white house, kevin from louisiana on hours port line. i am actually for the drones for one big reason. we used to be the king of technolog
forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you saw the same thing when mr. obama was on the verge of being elected. one other thing they have in common, we talk about mr. mandela serving 27 years in prison but we don't necessarily talk about why and what were the core issues there. they were dedicated to the premise of one person, one vote. so without that 1965 voting rights act, which is a direct product of the civil rights movement, mr. obama's presidency does not exist. they're bound together by that same issue and the activism that was required in order to make -- >> that's a good point. >> in addition to the comparisons between the two of them, which is important, i think the other remarkable thing is the thread of liberty that connects them across space and time. the abolitionist improvement inspired thorough who inspired gandhi who inspired mandela. i
from you. >> yes of course. of course. adam: you think the midterm elections everyone is talking about that, we'll see this rhetoric get ramped up even worse? >> good question. the president has other big fish on his -- one of the, politicians love diversions. we have obamacare which is obviously blowing up, right? adam: he needs a diversion. what better than favorite whipping boy. >> jamie dimon. maybe squeeze another 13 billion out of jamespy and -- jamie and everybody will forget about obamacare. i have to go to lunch. adam: enjoy. >>> new parents going back to their roots when it comes to naming their kids. baby center.com unveiled the top 100 baby names in 2013. >> anthony on that list? adam: no. coming in at number three, liam. >> how about vito? adam: no. last year's top name, aden, dropped to number two. top boy's name for eight straight years. what was other one. >> tony. adam: tony is on there i think. taking top spot for most popular boy's name, jackson. for girls, third most popular is olivia. coming number two, emma. what is miss germany's name? >> eileen. adam: not on the
there to protect the taxpayer is a lot of times the democrats that the union ves elected, anyway. so you've got no one there to protect the -- >> well, in the past when officials have not wanted to pay up for raises at the time, they say don't worry, we'll take care of you at the pension. 30 years down the road they're not necessarily going to be honored all the time. it's not just the pensioners who are going to feel pain. this is every constituency. >> in the private sectors, they know if they put their company out of business, they're going to still have a job. and cities can't believe this is happening. we would be back to where every single time they're going to think, hey, we can -- >> the rest of the nation is watching what happens in detroit. it's going to be appealed. the union ves said they're going to appeal this decision. but the judge who ruled yesterday said he will not stay his decision awaiting that appeal. when we come back, we'll talk november expectations for the adp jobs report. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it fou
commissioner has now been appointed by mayor-elect bill de blasio to lead it again. bratton ran the nypd from 1994 to 1996 under former mayor rudy giuliani. he developed tactics that led to a steep decline in crime. >>> a handwritten manuscript of bruce springsteen's 1975 hit, born to run, sold for $197,000 in auction in new york. the presale estimate was 70 to $100,000. sotheby's says the document a used to be in the collection of springsteen's former manager. that is valuable. those are theenews headlines on the fox business network. now back to tracy. are you a fan? tracy: huge! i could actually recite every line to every song on that album but i won't, then i will -- >> who has time. tracy: i just get enough of that around here. jamie colby, thank you very much. ♪ all right to the special series, gotta have it. no one enjoys holidays more than the kids, the big trick to find toys fun but educational. they stand apart producing learning toys for kids and parents, leapfrog. the ceo joins us. nice good ol' friend of fox. john, good to see you. how are the holidays looking? there is nove it
all the people who thought that the black people in africa who thought that as soon as he was elected, things were going to look much better. they would have houses, cars, that didn't materialize. it was a crazy system that set up before that. >> that would have taken a redistribution. >> they did exactly that. >> mandela was somebody who would personally get involved in all kinds of issues. we're going to be speak, richard branson later this morning. he received a personal phone call from mandela asking him to step in and save some jobs by investing in a company. he's going to talk to us about that. he's somebody who saw the plight, reached out on a personal level and tried to make a difference every day. >> michelle, are you coming back? >> i think so. >> because i want to ask you about the south african economy. it is a member of the g-20. it is one of the leading countries and i know guys have put money into that country who made a lot of money there. >> they're considered one of the fragile five, as we call it. so if we start to see tapering -- right. just like indonesia or india
the time mandela was released the anc was unbanned until the election. there was a negotiation process. and one of the calculations that f.w. de klerk and the national party made was that they could win the negotiation process and maintain a degree of white control for a longer period. and one of the way theys set it up was a preconstitutional negotiation that had all of the homelands there and their leaders represented, the african national congress and the others and the anc was outnumbered there. i sat in on a number of those sessions. the homeland leaders almost all went with the national party in the beginning but it was really interesting. there was a shift around '93 when the homeland base for the national party began to crumble, when it was absolutely clear that the african national congress remitted the overwhelming majority of the south african people. and the negotiations broke down to basically the two big party, the national party and the anc working things out. and f.w. de klerk and his advisers realized they wouldn't be able to bum rush some sort of mild transition. >> h
? this is what speaker boehner said last week. >> the american people work hard and they expect their elected representatives to do the same. today the house has passed nearly 150 bills in congress that united states senate has failed to act on. >> so that's a bit of the blame game. we looked at those 1 a bills and it turns out that nearly a third of them went after obama care which of course is a nonstarter with democrats and on the other hand, senate has passed some bills like immigration reform that have crawled to a halt in the house. now congress has passed some major legislation. things like the violence against women act. overall, what is going on here is divided government with sharply divided politics. it means all of these folks up here have one major accomplishment they share. this is the least productive congress in modern history. back to you. >> all right, lisa dejourdan. thank you. >>> coming up, the focus of our debate for you with the political panel. can lawmakers stop playing the blame game long enough to get a little bit of work done? panelists will break it down. >> and o
sat down with then cnn anchor bernie shaw just one day before he would be elected africa's president. >> everyone is curious about you. you have one cavity filling. you're 75 years old. your body has many muscles. your smile is earnest, but your eyes and your mind come the ages. who are you? >> well, this is a difficult question. i have not been able to answer it, but i am part and parcel of a team which has been part of the anti-apartheid movement of this country, and there are many men and women from different political affiliations who have contributed with this struggle. i am one of those. i would like to be remembered not as anybody unique or special, but as part of a great team of this country that has struggled for many years, for decades and centuries to bring about this day. >> when did you last cry and about what? >> pardon? >> when did you last cry and about what? >> well, i can't remember, but one of the things that has worried me is the fact that i do not have the chance to sit down with my children and grandchildren and be able to quiet them in the many difficulties tha
after the election, it will detonate a sub-prime debt crisis of his making? >> the greatest danger in terms of interest rates would be to have a government who believed in more borrowing, more spending, and more taxing. that is what would drive up interest rates, that is what would hit the cost of living and that is what every family in this country should dread. >> order. >> you're been watching prime minister's questions. question time airs on c-span2 every wednesday. again on sunday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. you can watch anytime at c- span.org. >> a conversation with supreme court justice elena kagan about the inner workings of the supreme court. after that, a discussion of the constitution and the rule of justice with supreme court justice clarence thomas. then, the future of the republican party is seen by strategist anna navarro. >> next, supreme court justice elena kagan discussing the working of the u.s. supreme court at the university of alabama law school. >> i'm having to get used to that title. we appreciate your service in this role. i join inand welcoming
rating as he heads into a possible re-election campaign. yesterday numbers show a field poll finds nearly 6 in 10 registered voters approve of his performance. 52% say they would vote for him. his closest challenger lieutenant governor able maldonado is backed by 11%. the governor hasn't said if he will seek another term. >>> the batkid returns to san francisco. 5-year-old miles scott of siskiyou county won our hearts last month as he saved the city from evil villains. that was his dream as he battled and beat cancer. miles will help a make a wish fundraiser tomorrow at the aquatic park at jefferson and hide streets with a 5-k run at 8:30. >>> live pictures of the caltrain christmas train. it's parked near at&t park at the caltrain station. beautiful. decorated with 60,000 glittering lights. the train will stop at stations between san francisco and santa clara tomorrow and sunday evening. so there will be entertainment but crews will be collecting toys for local children. >> a little feliz navidad. >>> time now 6:10. celebrating the life of nelson mandela. president obama reacts to the de
as he heads into a possible re-election campaign. yesterday numbers show a field poll finds nearly 6 in 10 registered voters approve of his performance. 52% say they would vote for him. his closest challenger lieutenant governor able maldonado is backed by 11%. the governor hasn't said if he will seek another term. >>> 5:08. it's the return of batkid coming back to the city. this time he is helping others. we'll tell you coming up. >> and caltrain is rolling into the holiday spirit. the christmas train is getting ready to make stops this morning for a good cause. >> freezing temperatures outside again. first it was the cold, now we have some rain maybe snow coming up. we'll talk about it. >> and if you are heading towards the bay bridge this is what it looks like this morning. they just cleared the roadwork from the incline towards treasure island. full look at your drive times will help you get to work on time. your friday morning commute coming up next. ,,,,,,,,,, last year was the biggest flu outbreak in over a decade. before the first sneeze... help protect with a spray. before t
for reconciliation and forgiveness. four years after his release he was elected president. nelson mandela was 95 years old. he had been ill on and off for more than a year. he passed peacefully surrounded by his family. >>> students will probably be wide awake at one south bay community college. in the next half hour we will show you why students have to deal with the freezing cold even when they are inside the classroom. >>> and $7 for a gallon of milk? it might sound ridiculous now but prices could reach record highs next month. the washington stalemate that could wreck your budget. >>> born. right now we are looking at a commute that is still doing very well as we put up a live picture of highway 4. it looks good here but i will tell you where it is beginning to show some signs of slowing. >>> outside our doors this morning. joined by record breaking temperatures once again in some areas. we will compare the numbers and in the extended forecast for your bay area weekend rain and local snow. i love having a free checked bag with my united mileageplus explorer card. i've saved $75 in checked ba
with tremendous hope when nelson mandela was elected. and i think you've seen quite a bit of that hope whittled away. it's one of the most unequaled country in the world. crime remains an indem i believe problem. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i thin
in the 1944 election. and joe kennedy says to harry truman, 'harry, what are you doing working for that crippled sob who killed my son joe?' c-span: there's a woman that is always around fdr in your book, someone named margaret suckley, daisy suckley. who was she and where did you get the information about her? >> guest: daisy suckley was a distant cousin of roosevelt. c-span: she's in the middle in this picture. >> guest: let me take a little closer look. yes. and daisy suckley was a person who roosevelt would confide in, things that he would not tell to anybody else. he felt perfectly comfortable. because she adored him, he knew he had her absolute trust. so he to--he told her things that, for example, would have very much surprised other members of the--of the roosevelt team, one of which was the state of fdr's health. from the last year at least of fdr's life, he w--he was a dying man. he had been examined at the bethesda naval center by cardiologists that realized he had astronomic blood pressure, that he was suffering from hardened--hardening of the arteries. amazingly, r
the right to work. then he led the election. he didn't just leave, circumstances change. the freedom of that change with global opinion. >> i was in college when he was freed, rick, and you have this sense, especially looking back historically, that he's released and all is well. and that was the opposite of actually what was the case. when chris hani was an anc leader, was murdered, that was a seminole moment. you talked about when then mandela goes to f.w. de klerk and says, you have to stop this or virtually everything will go off the rails. >> and he went on television in south africa that night rather than de klerk ask showed that he was the father of the nation. as you know, i was with him when his father was murdered. we were in kuno, had just taken an early morning walk, the phone rang and he picked it up and got the news. he was on the phone for about 15 minutes, his expression never changed. he put down the phone and turned to me with a little ex aspiration and said, man, where is our porridge? he was so calm in a crisis and then he rose to that. he said that was when south
we elect people, put them on staff? if that's the way it is, i understand. i'm a pragmatic realist. in the end, i would think it's important that somebody reads it before they pass it because i think all the surprises in obama it's not fair to put many public workers back in this kind of gray area again. this is supposed to save $150 billion over the next several decades and all eyes will be focused on illinois because it's the worst and it's trying to get better. back to you, simon. >>> tweet time. jeff bezos reveals they are experimenting with drone-based delivery. the service amazon prime air could be ready in the next four or five years and could carry objects to customers within a ten-mile radius of an amazon distribution center. is it a great idea? what's the worst that could happen? tweet us @squawkstreet. [ female announcer ] thanks for financing my first car. thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those w
tax-- true he's not going along for everything for sure, but then we have an election in 2016 which we'll get a new president and i think whether it's a democrat or a republican you'll find the new president far more amenable to good economic policies than obama and his administration has been. i mean, you could get another clinton-like democrat in there or you could get a reagan republican in there. and you would have a boom that you couldn't imagine how wonderful it's going to be. and that's why i'm really bullish about the stock market. i think the stock market looks at what will be, stuart, not what has been. and when you look to the future, i am very optimistic about change in america. i mean, just look at what's happened with obamacare. i mean, who-- you know it has to collapse, you know it's just built on unsound theory and unsound data, but seeing is actually collapsing before our very eyes is very, very fulfilling and not in the sense that we want it to collapse, but that we know the silly give away themes don't work. stuart: we hear you, i think you're putting a smile on a lo
level. cornyn made that statement during a google hang out section. is he running for re-election. >>> while republicans attack obama care, the white house is about to go on the offensive, making a new push to tout the program's benefits as it tries to turn public opinion after two months of really bad publicity. cnn's senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is in washington to tell us how. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. this is a push that president obama is beginning today and is going to take place over the next few weeks. he will be trying to focus not on the website, which still has some issues, although it's doing better, but focus instead on his signature health care program. and then what we're going to see, starting tomorrow, is an emphasis each day on what the white house feels are some of the best selling points, consumer selling points for this program. tomorrow, for instance, is going to be preventive care. thursday, they will focus on pre-existing conditions that insurance companies now must cover folks for. still, of course, there are some p
this is in serious jeopardy before we get to the midterm elections of being significantly modified if not being repealed. dagen: will be modified in terms of losing your doctor? for example out in california, running his own exchanges, a similar situation if you look at some of the cheaper plans in the exchange california is running where it is not the amount of doctors or different doctors in these plans. people will be in for a shock like you said. >> frankly are the young folks necessary to keep them afloat, will they enroll? a story out the said nearly one out of three people that have signed up on the exchanges information wasn't getting to the insurers, cancellations or duplicates, so are the young folks go to sign up in time and will the insurers have the information they need? connell: thank you very much. dagen: more from detroit. the judge in the detroit bankruptcy ruling the city is eligible for bankruptcy. jeff flock has more from the courtroom. what is going on? jeff: as you might guess, it is being repealed the attorneys. you are live on the fox business network, sir. tell me your
they're just buying tablets. >> on twitter. by the way, twitter has elected margie scar did i no to the board. a former head of the economist group. i think a nokia director in some capacity. so a little diversity of the board. >> hewlett packard doesn't just have diversity. it's a great turn around. >> i think that's always an interesting point. we talk so much about ladies in the top office, but there you've got meg whitman and cathy lesjack and they are running that company. >> and the cfos in this country, i don't mean to be sexist or even recognize gender, but two of the best cfos in the country are women. women who are watching the show are -- or teenagers or those in your 20s, go into finance. there's jobs there. >> when we come back this morning, a live interview with ford's ceo alan mulally as the automaker unveils a new redesigned mustang for 2016. but what about his future at the company? we'll see what happens. we're going to get factory orders and draghi's presser continues. a lot more "squawk on the street" in a moment. . tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 life inspires your t
an election and decide how these issues get resolved. accommodation suggests they will get a deal in the next couple of days. dagen: this is if you have described it to use your words some low hanging fruit. how does this deal come together and what are the chances it does? >> i think it is slightly better than 50% chance it is going to get done. remember, the two chairs negotiating the steel are not here to tell us what they want to get done, they feel confident they will get something done. the issue here is last-minute demands. the republicans think they need some level of entitlement changes to get the rank-and-file members, thre slayer pushing han this changes to hospital spending for medicaid. the democrats pushing for more spending on unemployment insurance possibly inclusion of the minimum wage. all of those make it harder for rank-and-file members to vote for it. so the plan will actually narrow in the next day or so before they come to a deal. that is why they could get $45 billion instead of $65 billion just because they'ry are having so much trouble to come to an agreement on the
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